Details


Published
March 8, 2018

Publisher
Bloomsbury Children's Books

ISBN
1408885077

ASIN
B079SXYFDT

Genre
Romance
Contemporary


More Than We Can Tell
by Brigid Kemmerer   



Summary

Rev works hard to keep the demons of the time before his adoption at bay ... until a letter from his father after his 18th birthday brings the trauma of his childhood hurtling back.

Emma escapes real life by perfecting the online game she built from scratch. Coding is way easier than facing her parents' nasty relationship or the growing distance with her best friend ... But when an online troll's harassment starts to escalate, she fears for her safety.

When Rev and Emma meet, they're buckling under the weight of their secrets. Though both of them find it hard to put their problems into words, they connect instantly and deeply. Rev and Emma's problems might be worlds apart, but they promise to help each other no matter what.

But promises are made to be tested and some things hurt more than we can tell.

Review

"Compelling and heartbreaking"  By Ashia 2 months ago

- rating
- story
- characters


Review

MORE THAN WE CAN TELL is a bit different from its companion book, Letters to the Lost, but the themes the author explores here are every bit as heavy and serious. This is not a light read, and it's every bit as compelling and heartbreaking as the previous book.

Rev Fletcher has a tragic past, and I read about the things done to him in horror. I don't doubt that such things do happen, and it's heartbreaking, especially when it happens to kids who are vulnerable and innocent. You can understand his scars and the fears that still haunt him, how they drive his actions. But I'm glad he has such supportive and understanding adoptive parents, and they're the reasons he turned out to be a decent young man.

Emma Blue is one of the reasons I was attracted to his story. She's a gamer and developer of this RPG game. I love geeks and gaming and I couldn't resist. The author also took this opportunity to highlight the challenges facing women in this male-dominated industry (computers and tech and gaming). While I appreciate Emma's independence, I grew frustrated with her when she wouldn't even accept Rev's help and I don't know what her problem was when it's obvious the situation is beyond her control. Her reactions whenever Nightmare sent her a message is a bit over the top (slamming laptops shut, etc) though understandable, and I would've thought she'd appreciate and want Rev's help. She seems adamant about not accepting help though, either from her parents or Rev or any authority figure with the mess she'd found herself in, and I'm baffled as to why. So I find her character a bit contradictory.

Readers who've loved Letters to the Lost will be happy to know Declan had a bit of a cameo here and we're also given insights into what happened after the end of the previous book. Of course, he and Juliet got together, but there's something else about his personal life, some closure to his situation.

Though the story is told from the first person POV, the points of view alternates between Emma and Rev, for which I'm grateful because I feel this gives a story depth than if the story were just seen from one person's POV.

I can't end this review without mentioning Matthew and the friendship between the boys. I think it was heartwarming, the way it went down between them, especially with Rev.

Also, this book drives home the point that things aren't what they seem, especially over the Internet and the dangers inherent in using this medium to unsuspecting people--both adults and kids--without giving a lecture about it. Highly recommended.